Effect of high hip center on stress for dysplastic hip

Yong Nie, Fuxing Pei, Zongming Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

High hip center reconstruction has been advocated in treating deficient acetabulum. However, there is no consensus on the clinical outcome of this technique. In addition, it remains unclear to what extend this technique restores the normal hip biomechanics. The goal of this study was to investigate stress above the acetabular dome in response to a range of high hip center positioning for Crowe type I and II hip dysplasia. This study consisted of 2 main parts, radiologic and biomechanical. Pelvic radiographs of 18 patients were studied to determine the amount of displacement of the hip center in the superior direction compared with the normal side. Second, qualitative and quantitative changes in stress on cortical and trabecular bone in the region of the acetabular dome as a result of superior displacement of the hip center were analyzed with subject-specific finite element models. The results showed that the range of the hip center position in the superior direction for Crowe type I and II hip dysplasia was 0 to 15 mm above the contralateral femoral head center. When superior displacement of the hip center exceeded 5 mm above the anatomic hip center, cortical bone mass on the 2 thickest cross-sections above the acetabular dome decreased quickly and the stress value on posterolateral cortical bone was obviously lower than the normal level. This study showed that to restore the normal load above the acetabular dome, there is a limit of 5 mm above the anatomic hip center for high hip center acetabular reconstruction for Crowe type I and II hip dysplasia. (Figure Presented).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e637-e643
JournalOrthopedics
Volume37
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2014
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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