Early coronary angiography in patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest without ST-segment elevation: Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

TOMAHAWK, PEARL, and COACT investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: To compare early coronary angiography to a delayed or selective approach in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) without ST-segment elevation of possible cardiac cause by means of meta-analysis of available randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Methods: We searched MEDLINE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for RCTs comparing early with delayed or selective coronary angiography in OHCA patients of possible cardiac origin without ST-segment elevation. The primary endpoint was all-cause short-term mortality (PROSPERO CRD42021271484). Results: The search strategy identified three RCTs enrolling a total of 1167 patients. An early invasive approach was not associated with improved short-term mortality (odds ratio 1.19, 95% confidence interval 0.94–1.52; p = 0.15). Further, no significant differences were shown with respect to the risk of severe neurological deficit, the composite of all-cause mortality or severe neurological deficit, need for renal replacement therapy due to acute renal failure, and significant bleeding at short-term follow-up. Conclusion: Early coronary angiography in OHCA without ST-segment elevation is not superior compared to a delayed/selective approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)330-337
Number of pages8
JournalCatheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions
Volume100
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2022

Keywords

  • coronary angiography
  • out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
  • survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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