Duloxetine and care management treatment of older adults with comorbid major depressive disorder and chronic low back pain: Results of an open-label pilot study

Jordan F. Karp, Debra K. Weiner, Mary A. Dew, Amy Begley, Mark D. Miller, Charles F. Reynolds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: In older adults, major depressive disorder (MDD) and chronic low back pain (CLBP) are common and mutually exacerbating. We predicted that duloxetine pharmacotherapy and Depression and Pain Care Management (DPCM) would result in (1) significant improvement in MDD and CLBP and (2) significant improvements in health-related quality of life, anxiety, disability, self-efficacy, and sleep quality. Design and Intervention: Twelve week open-label study using duloxetine up to 120 mg/day+DPCM. Setting: Outpatient late-life depression research clinic. Patients: Thirty community-dwelling adults >60 years old. Outcome Measures: Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short Form (MPQ-SF). Results: 46.7% (n=14) of the sample had a depression remission. All subjects who met criteria for the depression remission also had a pain response. 93.3% (n=28) had a significant pain response. Of the subjects who met criteria for a low back pain response, 50% (n=14) also met criteria for the depression remission. The mean time to depression remission was 7.6 (SE=0.6) weeks. The mean time to pain response was 2.8 (SE=0.5) weeks. There were significant improvements in mental health-related quality of life, anxiety, sleep quality, somatic complaints, and both self-efficacy for pain management and for coping with symptoms. Physical health-related quality of life, back pain-related disability, and self-efficacy for physical functioning did not improve. Conclusions: Serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors like duloxetine delivered with DPCM may be a good choice to treat these linked conditions in older adults. Treatments that target low self-efficacy for physical function and improving disability may further increase response rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)633-642
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume25
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Back pain
  • Clinical trial
  • Depression
  • Geriatric
  • Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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