Diffusion MRI-guided theta burst stimulation enhances memory and functional connectivity along the inferior longitudinal fasciculus in mild cognitive impairment

Yu Chin Chen, Viet Ton That, Chidi Ugonna, Yilin Liu, Lynn Nadel, Ying Hui Chou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) during aging is often a harbinger of Alzheimer's disease, and, therefore, early intervention to preserve cognitive abilities before the MCI symptoms become medically refractory is particularly critical. Functional MRI-guided transcranial magnetic stimulation is a promising approach for modulating hippocampal functional connectivity and enhancing memory in healthy adults. Here, we extend these previous findings to individuals with MCI and leverage theta burst stimulation (TBS) and white matter tractography derived from diffusion-weighted MRI to target the hippocampus. Our preliminary findings suggested that TBS could be used to improve associative memory performance and increase resting-state functional connectivity of the hippocampus and other brain regions, including the occipital fusiform, frontal orbital cortex, putamen, posterior parahippocampal gyrus, and temporal pole, along the inferior longitudinal fasciculus in MCI. Although the sample size is small, these results shed light on how TBS propagates from the superficial cortex around the parietal lobe to the hippocampus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere2113778119
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume119
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - May 24 2022

Keywords

  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • memory
  • mild cognitive impairment
  • theta burst stimulation
  • transcranial magnetic stimulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Diffusion MRI-guided theta burst stimulation enhances memory and functional connectivity along the inferior longitudinal fasciculus in mild cognitive impairment'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this