Development and validation of the health competence beliefs inventory in young adults with and without a history of childhood cancer

Branlyn Werba Derosa, Anne E. Kazak, Kinjal Doshi, Lisa A. Schwartz, Jill Ginsberg, Jun J. Mao, Joseph Straton, Wendy Hobbie, Mary T. Rourke, Claire Carlson, Richard F. Ittenbach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Adolescent and young adult survivors of childhood cancer are a vulnerable population. Health beliefs may be related to necessary follow-up care. Purpose: This study seeks to develop a measure of health beliefs for adolescents and young adults with and without a history of cancer. Methods: Inductive and deductive methods and focus groups were used to develop the Health Competence Beliefs Inventory. Cancer survivors (n∈=∈138) and comparison participants (n∈=∈130) completed the Health Competence Beliefs Inventory and other measures. Healthcare providers reported current medical problems. Results: A series of iterative exploratory factor analyses generated a 21-item four-factor solution: (1) Health Perceptions; (2) Satisfaction with Healthcare; (3) Cognitive Competence; and (4) Autonomy. Survivors reported significantly different Health Competence Beliefs Inventory scale scores than comparisons (p∈<∈.05). The Health Competence Beliefs Inventory was associated with beliefs, affect, quality of life, posttraumatic stress symptoms, and medical problems. Conclusions: The Health Competence Beliefs Inventory is a promising measure of adolescent and young adult perceptions of health and well-being.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)48-58
Number of pages11
JournalAnnals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Beliefs
  • Cancer
  • Health
  • Psychological outcomes
  • Survivorship
  • Young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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