Developing an ACT-based intervention to address lung cancer stigma: Stakeholder recommendations and feasibility testing in two NCI-designated cancer centers

Deanna M. Kaplan, Heidi A. Hamann, Sarah N. Price, Timothy J. Williamson, Elizabeth S. Ver Hoeve, Mairead H. McConnell, Jennifer E. Duchschere, Linda L Garland, Jamie S. Ostroff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Few psychosocial interventions have been tailored to meet the unique needs of patients diagnosed with lung cancer. This pilot study developed and tested a six-week intervention for reducing lung cancer stigma.Design and Subjects: Guided by qualitative interviews conducted with 9 lung cancer patients and 5 thoracic oncology care providers, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy was adapted for treatment of lung cancer stigma (ACT-LCS). In a subsequent single arm pilot study, 22 lung cancer patients reporting high levels of stigma completed the intervention.Setting: NCI-designated cancer centers in the Southwestern and Eastern United States.Results: Of 46 eligible patients, 22 provided consent, with 20 completing the intervention (10 in-person, 10 telehealth). Overall stigma decreased across timepoints, largely driven by reductions in internalized stigma. There were also significant reductions in social isolation, sleep disturbance, and fatigue.Conclusions: The ACT-LCS protocol demonstrates preliminary feasibility and acceptability. This intervention may be particularly suited for helping patients navigate feelings associated with internalized stigma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Psychosocial Oncology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • acceptance and commitment therapy
  • lung neoplasm
  • psycho-oncology
  • social adjustment: stakeholder-informed research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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