Cultural landscapes and environmental ethics: The case of puslinch township's historic roadside trees

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

I have argued, then, that is simplistic and potentially dangerous to suppose that a contractarian model can adequately account for all of the moral relations in agriculture or serve singularly as a basis for policy. Conversely, I do not naively argue that we ought simply to replace a contractarian based agricultural ethic with an ethic of care such as the one I have outlined. A single farmer may be a spouse, parent, son or daughter, caretaker of land, keep of animals, business operator and partner, employer, processor, and consumer. Agriculture itself encompasses all of these relations. Both our ethical systems and social and economic policies must reflect and build on this diversity of contexts and associated practices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)189-203
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1994
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • History
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Environmental Science(all)

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