Can high school achievement tests serve to select college students?

Adriana D. Cimetta, Jerome V. D'Agostino, Joel R. Levin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Postsecondary schools have traditionally relied on admissions tests such as the SAT. and ACT to select students. With high school achievement assessments in place in many states, it is important to ascertain whether scores from those exams can either supplement or supplant conventional admissions tests. In this study we examined whether the Arizona Instrument to Measure Standards (AIMS) high school tests could serve as a useful predictor of college performance. Stepwise regression analyses with a predetermined order of variable entry revealed that AIMS generally did not account for additional performance variation when added to high school grade-point average (HSGPA) and SAT. However, in a cohort of students that took the test for graduation purposes, AIMS did account for about the same proportion of variance as SAT when added to a model that included HSGPA. The predictive value of both SAT and AIMS was generally the same for Caucasian, Hispanic, and Asian American students. The ramifications of universities using high school achievement exams as predictors of college success, in addition to or in lieu of traditional measures, are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-12
Number of pages10
JournalEducational Measurement: Issues and Practice
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Achievement testing
  • Aptitude
  • College admissions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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