Campylobacter abundance in breastfed infants and identification of a new species in the global enterics multicenter study

Xiaoming Bian, Jolene M. Garber, Kerry K. Cooper, Steven Huynh, Jennifer Jones, Michael K. Mills, Daniel Rafala, Dilruba Nasrin, Karen L. Kotloff, Craig T. Parker, Sharon M. Tennant, William G. Miller, Christine M. Szymanski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of bacterial diarrhea worldwide and is associated with high rates of mortality and growth stunting in children inhabiting lowto middle-resource countries. To better understand the impact of breastfeeding on Campylobacter infection in infants in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, we examined fecal microbial compositions, bacterial isolates, and their carbohydrate metabolic pathways in Campylobacter-positive infants <1 year of age from the Global Enterics Multicenter Study. Exclusively breastfed infants with diarrhea exhibited high Campylobacter abundances, and this negatively correlated with bacterial carbohydrate metabolism. Although C. jejuni and Campylobacter coli are prevalent among these infants, the second most abundant Campylobacter species was a new species, which we named "Candidatus Campylobacter infans. " Asymptomatic Campylobacter carriers also possess significantly different proportions of specific gut microbes compared to diarrheal cases. These findings provide insight into Campylobacter infections in infants in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia and help inform strategies aimed at eliminating campylobacteriosis in these areas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere00735
JournalmSphere
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2020

Keywords

  • " gut microbiome
  • "Candidatus campylobacter infans
  • Breastfeeding
  • Campylobacter
  • GEMS
  • L-fucose metabolism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Molecular Biology

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