Bevacizumab combined with capecitabine and oxaliplatin in patients with advanced adenocarcinoma of the small bowel or ampulla of vater: A single-center, open-label, phase 2 study

Pat Gulhati, Kanwal Raghav, Rachna T. Shroff, Gauri R. Varadhachary, Scott Kopetz, Milind Javle, Wei Qiao, Huamin Wang, Jeffrey Morris, Robert A. Wolff, Michael J. Overman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Capecitabine with oxaliplatin (CAPOX) has previously demonstrated clinical activity in patients with small bowel adenocarcinoma (SBA) and ampullary adenocarcinoma (AAC). Herein, the authors conducted a phase 2 trial to evaluate the benefit of adding bevacizumab to CAPOX. METHODS: In this phase 2, single-arm, single-center, open-label study, patients aged ≥18 years with untreated, advanced SBA or AAC were recruited. Patients received capecitabine at a dose of 750 mg/m2 orally twice daily on days 1 to 14, oxaliplatin at a dose of 130 mg/m2 intravenously on day 1, and bevacizumab at a dose of 7.5 mg/kg intravenously on day 1 of a 21-day cycle. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS) at 6 months. Secondary objectives included response rate, overall PFS, overall survival, and toxicity. RESULTS: Between August 2011 and November 2014, a total of 30 patients were enrolled into the study (male/female ratio of 13/17; median age of 63 years [range, 33-78 years]; and 7 patients with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status [ECOG PS] of 0, 20 patients with an ECOG PS of 1, and 3 patients with an ECOG PS of 2). Of the 30 patients, 23 (77%) had SBA (18 of duodenal origin and 5 of jejunal/ileal origin) and 7 patients (23%) had AAC (5 of pancreaticobiliary subtype, 1 of mixed subtype, and 1 of intestinal subtype). The most common grade 3 toxicities observed were fatigue and hypertension (7 patients each [23%]), neutropenia (6 patients [20%]), and diarrhea (3 patients [10%]) (toxicity was graded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events [version 4.0]). The probability of PFS at 6 months was 68% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 52% to 88%). The response rate was 48.3%, with 1 complete response and 13 partial responses; 10 patients achieved stable disease. At a median follow-up of 25.9 months, the median PFS was 8.7 months (95% CI, 4.9-10.5 months) and the median overall survival was 12.9 months (95% CI, 9.2-19.7 months). CONCLUSIONS: The results of the current study indicate that CAPOX with bevacizumab is an active and well-tolerated regimen for patients with SBA and AAC. These findings support the need for further investigation into the clinical benefit of targeting angiogenesis in patients with SBA and AAC. Cancer 2017;123:1011–17.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1011-1017
Number of pages7
JournalCancer
Volume123
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • ampullary adenocarcinoma
  • bevacizumab
  • capecitabine with oxaliplatin (CAPOX)
  • small bowel adenocarcinoma
  • small bowel cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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