Behavioral phenotyping based on physical inactivity can predict sleep in female rats before, during, and after sleep disruption

Kora N. Kostiew, Diya Tuli, Jamie E. Coborn, Christopher M. Sinton, Jennifer A. Teske

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: A noninvasive method that can accurately quantify sleep before, during, and after sleep disruption (SD) has not been validated in female rats across their estrous cycle. In female rats, we hypothesized that the duration of physical inactivity (PIA) required to predict sleep would 1) change with the differences in baseline sleep between the circadian and estrous cycle phases and 2) predict sleep and the change in sleep (Δsleep) before, during, and after SD independent of circadian and estrous cycle phase. New methods: EEG, EMG, physical activity and estrous cycle phase were measured in female Sprague-Dawley rats before, during, and after SD. Sleep was determined by two methods [EEG/EMG and a duration of continuous PIA (i.e., PIA criterion)]. Reliability between the methods was tested with a previously validated criterion (40 s). Sensitivity analyses and criterion-related validity analyses for sleep during SD and recovery were conducted across multiple PIA criteria (10 s–120 s). Predictability between the two methods and Δsleep was calculated. Results/comparison with existing methods: Three criteria (10 s, 20 s, 30 s) predicted baseline sleep independent of circadian and estrous cycle phase. Sleep during SD and recovery were predicted by two criteria (30 s and 10 s). Δsleep between study periods was not reliably predicted by a single PIA criterion. Conclusion: PIA predicted sleep independent of estrous cycle phase in female rats. However, the specific criterion was dependent upon the study period (before, during, and after SD) and circadian phase. Thus, prior work validating a PIA criterion in male rodents is not applicable to the female rat.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number110030
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Methods
Volume402
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2024

Keywords

  • Brain
  • Noise pollution
  • Obesity
  • Phenotyping

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Neuroscience

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