Associations of components of sarcopenia with risk of fracture in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study

R. J. Harris, N. Parimi, P. M. Cawthon, E. S. Strotmeyer, R. M. Boudreau, J. S. Brach, C. K. Kwoh, J. A. Cauley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Summary: Our aim was to evaluate the associations between the individual components of sarcopenia and fracture types. In this cohort, the risk of experiencing any clinical, hip, or major osteoporotic fracture is greater in men with slow walking speed in comparison to normal walking speed. Introduction: The association between the components of sarcopenia and fractures has not been clearly elucidated and has hindered the development of appropriate therapeutic interventions. Our aim was to evaluate the associations between the individual components of sarcopenia, specifically lean mass, strength, and physical performance and fracture (any fracture, hip fracture, major osteoporotic fracture) in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study. Methods: The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men study (MrOS) recruited 5995 men ≥ 65 years of age. We measured appendicular lean mass (ALM) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (low as residual value < 20th percentile for the cohort), walking speed (fastest trial of usual pace, values < 0.8 m/s were low), and grip strength (max score of 2 trials, values < 30 kg were low). Information on fractures was assessed tri-annually over an average follow-up of 12 years and centrally adjudicated. Cox proportional hazard models estimated the hazard ratio (HR) (95% confidence intervals) for slow walking speed, low grip strength, and low lean mass. Results: Overall, 1413 men had a fracture during follow-up. Slow walking speed was associated with an increased risk for any HR = 1.39, 1.05–1.84; hip HR = 2.37, 1.54–3.63; and major osteoporotic, HR = 1.89, 1.34–2.67 in multi-variate-adjusted models. Low lean mass and low grip strength were not significantly associated with fracture. Conclusions: In this cohort of older adult men, the risk of experiencing any, hip, or major osteoporotic fracture is greater in men with slow walking speed in comparison to men with normal walking speed, but low grip strength and low lean mass were not associated with fracture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1815-1821
Number of pages7
JournalOsteoporosis International
Volume33
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2022

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Fractures
  • Gait speed
  • Sarcopenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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