Association between change in brain gray matter volume, cognition, and depression severity: Pre- and post- antidepressant pharmacotherapy for late-life depression

K. Droppa, H. T. Karim, D. L. Tudorascu, J. F. Karp, C. F. Reynolds, H. J. Aizenstein, M. A. Butters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Late-life depression (LLD) is associated with cognitive impairments and reduced gray matter volume (GMV); however the mechanisms underlying this association are not well understood. The goal of this study was to characterize changes in depression severity, cognitive function, and brain structure associated with pharmacologic antidepressant treatment for LLD. We administered a detailed neurocognitive battery and conducted structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on 26 individuals with LLD, pre-/post-a 12-week treatment trial with venlafaxine. After calculating changes in cognitive performance, GMV, and depression severity, we calculated Pearson's correlations, performed permutation testing, and false discovery rate correction. We found that loss of GMV over 12 weeks in the superior orbital frontal gyrus was associated with less improvement in depression severity and that increased GMV in the same was associated with greater improvement in depression severity. We detected no associations between changes in cognitive performance and improvements in either depressive symptoms or changes in GMV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-134
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Psychiatric Research
Volume95
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Late-life depression
  • MRI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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