An overview on field-flow fractionation techniques and their applications in the separation and characterization of polymers

Fathi A. Messaud, Ron D. Sanderson, J. Ray Runyon, Tino Otte, Harald Pasch, S. Kim Ratanathanawongs Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

215 Scopus citations

Abstract

Field-flow fractionation (FFF) is a family of analytical techniques developed specifically for separating and characterizing macromolecules, supramolecular assemblies, colloids and particles. It combines the effects of a laminar flow profile with an exponential concentration profile of analyte components caused by their interactions with a physical field applied perpendicular to the flow of a carrier liquid. FFF is undergoing increasingly widespread use as researchers learn of its potential and versatility. This overview underlines the basic principle and theory behind FFF and reviews recent research efforts incorporating flow and thermal FFF methods to characterize natural, biological, and synthetic polymers. These FFF techniques will be discussed in terms of theory and practice. Selected applications of FFF and their coupling capability with other chromatographic techniques or spectrometric detection for the separation and characterization of polymers in organic and aqueous media are presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-368
Number of pages18
JournalProgress in Polymer Science
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Copolymer composition
  • Diffusion coefficient
  • Field-flow fractionation
  • High temperature separation
  • Size exclusion chromatography
  • Thermal diffusion coefficient

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Materials Chemistry

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