An Electronic Ecological Momentary Assessment Study to Examine the Consumption of High-Fat/High-Sugar Foods, Fruits/Vegetables, and Affective States Among Women

Yue Liao, Susan M. Schembre, Sydney G. O'Connor, Britni R. Belcher, Jaclyn P. Maher, Eldin Dzubur, Genevieve F. Dunton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To examine the associations between high-fat/high-sugar foods (HFHS) and fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption and affective states in women. Methods: The researchers used electronic ecological momentary assessment to capture HFHS and FV consumption in the past 2 hours (predictor) and current affective states (outcome) across 1 week among 202 women. Multilevel linear regression was conducted. Weight status was tested as a moderator. Results: Consumption of FV in the past 2 hours was positively associated with feeling happy (P <.05). Women who consumed more HFHS or fewer FV than others in the study reported higher average sadness (both P <.05). Overweight or obese women who reported more frequent HFHS consumption than others had higher average stress than normal weight women (P <.05). Conclusions and Implications: The association between HFHS consumption and stress might be stronger in overweight or obese than normal weight women. Future studies could further enhance the electronic ecological momentary assessment method to explore other time-varying moderators and mediators of food consumption and affect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)626-631
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
Volume50
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • dietary intake
  • free-living
  • overweight
  • smartphones
  • stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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