An Association Between Perceived Social Support and Posttraumatic Stress Symptom Severity Among Women With Lifetime Sexual Victimization: The Serial Mediating Role of Resilience and Coping

Michiyo Hirai, Ruby Charak, Laura D. Seligman, Joseph D. Hovey, John M. Ruiz, Timothy W. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the association between perceived social support and severity of posttraumatic stress symptoms, serially mediated by resilience and coping among women exposed to different patterns of sexual victimization experiences: childhood sexual abuse (CSA) only, adult sexual assault (ASA) only, and sexual revictimization (SR). A total of 255 sexually victimized women recruited from four U.S. universities completed self-report measures online; 112 participants reported provisionally diagnosable levels of symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The proposed model was largely supported in the CSA only group and the SR group. Different patterns of mediational effects were found across the three groups. Clinical and theoretical implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1966-1986
Number of pages21
JournalViolence Against Women
Volume26
Issue number15-16
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • coping
  • perceived social support
  • resilience
  • sexual victimization
  • trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

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