Acute inspiratory resistance training enhances endothelium-dependent dilation and retrograde shear rate in healthy young adults

Dallin Tavoian, Josie L. Mazzone, Daniel H. Craighead, E. Fiona Bailey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Inspiratory resistance training (IRT) yields significant reductions in resting blood pressure and improves vascular endothelial function. Our objective was to quantify the acute effects of IRT on brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and shear rates (SRs) in healthy men and women. Twenty young adults (22.9 ± 3.4 years; 10 male, 10 female) completed a single bout of IRT or Rest condition in a randomized crossover design. Brachial artery FMD was performed before, 10 min after, and 40 min after the assigned condition. Brachial artery blood flow velocities were collected during IRT, separated by breathing cycle phase, and converted into SRs. FMD improved 10 min post-IRT (+1.86 ± 0.61%; p = 0.025) but returned to baseline by 40 min post-IRT (p = 0.002). Anterograde SR decreased by 10% and retrograde SR increased 102% during resisted inspiration, relative to baseline SR (p < 0.001). Anterograde SR increased by 7% in men and women (p < 0.001) and retrograde SR decreased by 12% in women but not men (p = 0.022) during unresisted expiration, relative to baseline SR. A single bout of IRT elicits a transient enhancement in FMD in both men and women. Acute IRT-related enhancements in SRs may contribute to sustained improvements in FMD that have been reported previously.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere15943
JournalPhysiological reports
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2024
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • endothelial
  • exercise
  • flow-mediated dilation
  • respiratory
  • shear rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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