Accumulation of abasic sites induces genomic instability in normal human gastric epithelial cells during Helicobacter pylori infection

D. Kidane, D. L. Murphy, J. B. Sweasy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

Helicobacter pylori infection of the human stomach is associated with inflammation that leads to the release of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONs), eliciting DNA damage in host cells. Unrepaired DNA damage leads to genomic instability that is associated with cancer. Base excision repair (BER) is critical to maintain genomic stability during RONs-induced DNA damage, but little is known about its role in processing DNA damage associated with H. pylori infection of normal gastric epithelial cells. Here, we show that upon H. pylori infection, abasic (AP) sites accumulate and lead to increased levels of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs). In contrast, downregulation of the OGG1 DNA glycosylase decreases the levels of both AP sites and DSBs during H. pylori infection. Processing of AP sites during different phases of the cell cycle leads to an elevation in the levels of DSBs. Therefore, the induction of oxidative DNA damage by H. pylori and subsequent processing by BER in normal gastric epithelial cells has the potential to lead to genomic instability that may have a role in the development of gastric cancer. Our results are consistent with the interpretation that precise coordination of BER processing of DNA damage is critical for the maintenance of genomic stability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere128
JournalOncogenesis
Volume3
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Accumulation of abasic sites induces genomic instability in normal human gastric epithelial cells during Helicobacter pylori infection'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this