A test of the family stress model on toddler-aged children's adjustment among Hurricane Katrina impacted and nonimpacted low-income families

Laura V. Scaramella, Sara L. Sohr-Preston, Kristin L. Callahan, Scott P. Mirabile

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

79 Scopus citations

Abstract

Hurricane Katrina dramatically altered the level of social and environmental stressors for the residents of the New Orleans area. The Family Stress Model describes a process whereby felt financial strain undermines parents' mental health, the quality of family relationships, and child adjustment. Our study considered the extent to which the Family Stress Model explained toddler-aged adjustment among Hurricane Katrina affected and nonaffected families. Two groups of very low-income mothers and their 2-year-old children participated (pre-Katrina, n = 55; post-Katrina, n = 47). Consistent with the Family Stress Model, financial strain and neighborhood violence were associated with higher levels of mothers' depressed mood; depressed mood was linked to less parenting efficacy. Poor parenting efficacy was associated to more child internalizing and externalizing problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)530-541
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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