A real-world observational study assessing relationships between excessive daytime sleepiness and patient satisfaction in obstructive sleep apnea

Sairam Parthasarathy, Danielle Hyman, James Doherty, Ragy Saad, Jerry Zhang, Susan Morris, Lev Eldemir, Benjamin Fox, Mai Ka Ying Vang, Jessica Schroeder, Nell J. Marshall, Gregory S. Parks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives/Background: To estimate prevalence and severity of excessive daytime sleepiness among patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who were prescribed treatment; assess perception and satisfaction of OSA-related care; describe relationships between excessive daytime sleepiness, treatment adherence, and patient satisfaction. Patients/methods: A national population-based cross-sectional sample of US adults with clinician-diagnosed OSA was surveyed in January 2021 via Evidation Health's Achievement App. Patients completed the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, rated satisfaction with healthcare provider and overall OSA care, and reported treatment adherence. Covariates affecting excessive daytime sleepiness (average weekly sleep duration, treatment adherence, sleepiness-inducing medications, age, sex, body mass index, nasal congestion, smoking status, and comorbidities) were adjusted in multivariate regression models. Results: In 2289 participants (50.3 % women; 44.8 ± 11.1 years), EDS was highly prevalent (42 %), and was experienced by 36 % of patients with high positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy adherence. Each additional hour of nightly PAP use was associated with improved sleepiness (a 0.28-point lower Epworth score; p < 0.001). Excessive daytime sleepiness was associated with lower patient satisfaction with healthcare providers and overall care (OR [95 % CI] 0.62 [0.48–0.80] and 0.50 [0.39–0.64], respectively; p < 0.0001), whereas PAP adherence was associated with higher patient satisfaction (OR [95 % CI] 2.37 [1.64–3.43] and 2.91 [2.03–4.17]; p < 0.0001), after adjusting for confounders. Conclusions: In a real-world population-based study of patients with OSA, excessive daytime sleepiness was highly prevalent and associated with poor patient satisfaction ratings. Better patient-centered care among patients with OSA may require interventions aimed at addressing excessive daytime sleepiness and treatment adherence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)42-48
Number of pages7
JournalSleep Medicine
Volume114
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2024

Keywords

  • Apnea
  • Excessive daytime sleepiness
  • Patient satisfaction
  • Treatment adherence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Medicine

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A real-world observational study assessing relationships between excessive daytime sleepiness and patient satisfaction in obstructive sleep apnea'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this