A qualitative descriptive study of the COVID-19 pandemic: Impacts on nursing care delivery in the critical care work system

Claire Bethel, Jessica G. Rainbow, Karen Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic drastically changed the delivery of nursing care in U.S. critical care settings. The purpose of this study was to describe nurses’ perceptions of the critical care work system during the COVID-19 pandemic in the U.S. We conducted interviews with experienced critical care nurses who worked during the pandemic and analyzed these data using deductive content analysis framed by the Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety (SEIPS) 2.0 model. Concepts include the critical care work system structures, nursing care processes, outcomes, and adaptations during the pandemic. Our findings revealed a description of the critical care work system framed by the SEIPS 2.0 model. We suggest how human factors engineers can utilize a human factors and engineering approach to maximize the adaptations critical care nurses made to their work system during the pandemic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number103712
JournalApplied Ergonomics
Volume102
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2022

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • Care delivery
  • Critical care
  • Nursing
  • Redesign
  • Work system

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Engineering (miscellaneous)

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