A novel approach to studying early knee osteoarthritis illustrates that bilateral medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis is a heritable phenotype: an offspring study

Grace H. Lo, Michael J. Richard, Jane A. Cauley, Jeffrey B. Driban, Michael Strayhorn, James MacKay, Matthew S. Harkey, Timothy E. McAlindon, Mary Jansen, Stephanie Green, Donna L. White, C. Kent Kwoh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To assess the potential of studying offspring of people with and without knee osteoarthritis to understand the risk factors and heritability for knee osteoarthritis. We selected two groups of Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) participants from one clinical site: (1) participants with bilateral radiographic medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis and (2) those without tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. We then invited biological offspring ≥ 18 years old to complete an online survey that inquired about osteoarthritis risk factors and symptoms. Among the survey respondents, we recruited ten offspring of members from each group for a clinic visit with bilateral knee posterior-anterior radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging of the right knee. We established contact with 269/413 (65%) eligible OAI participants. Most (227/269, 84%) had ≥ 1 eligible biological offspring, and 213 (94%) were willing to share information about the new family study with their offspring. Our survey was completed by 188 offspring from 110 OAI participants: mean age of 43.0 (10.4) years, mean body mass index of 23.7 (5.9) kg/m2, 65% female. Offspring obesity (OR = 2.7, 95% CI 1.0–7.3), hypertension (OR = 3.7, 95% CI 1.2–11.3), and Heberden’s nodes (OR = 3.6, 95% CI 1.0–13.2) were associated with parental osteoarthritis status; however, adjusted models were not statistically significant. Radiographic tibiofemoral osteoarthritis (16/18 knees vs. 2/20 knees) and meniscal abnormalities (7/9 vs. 2/10 index knees) were more common among offspring with parental osteoarthritis status than not. We established the potential of a novel offspring study design within the OAI, and our results are consistent with bilateral radiographic medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis being a heritable phenotype of osteoarthritis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1063-1072
Number of pages10
JournalRheumatology International
Volume42
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Heritability
  • Knee
  • Offspring
  • Osteoarthritis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology

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