A low-glucose eating pattern improves biomarkers of postmenopausal breast cancer risk: An exploratory secondary analysis of a randomized feasibility trial

Susan M. Schembre, Michelle R. Jospe, Erin D. Giles, Dorothy D. Sears, Yue Liao, Karen M. Basen-Engquist, Cynthia A. Thomson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Postmenopausal breast cancer is the most common obesity-related cancer death among women in the U.S. Insulin resistance, which worsens in the setting of obesity, is associated with higher breast cancer incidence and mortality. Maladaptive eating patterns driving insulin resistance represent a key modifiable risk factor for breast cancer. Emerging evidence suggests that time-restricted feeding paradigms (TRF) improve cancer-related metabolic risk factors; however, more flexible approaches could be more feasible and effective. In this exploratory, secondary analysis, we identified participants following a low-glucose eating pattern (LGEP), defined as consuming energy when glucose levels are at or below average fasting levels, as an alternative to TRF. Results show that following an LGEP regimen for at least 40% of reported eating events improves insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and other cancer-related serum biomarkers. The magnitude of serum biomarkers changes observed here has previously been shown to favorably modulate benign breast tissue in women with overweight and obesity who are at risk for postmenopausal breast cancer. By comparison, the observed effects of LGEP were similar to results from previously published TRF studies in similar populations. These preliminary findings support further testing of LGEP as an alternative to TRF and a postmenopausal breast cancer prevention strategy. However, results should be interpreted with caution, given the exploratory nature of analyses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number4508
JournalNutrients
Volume13
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Blood glucose
  • Eating physiology
  • Food intake regulation
  • Metabolism
  • Obesity
  • Weight management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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